Roman and Mediaeval History, Illlustrated Travel Journals, Mediaeval Literature, Geology

  Towns and Nature Along the Baltic Sea Coasts - Part 1

I'm back, as usual with a truckload of photos. So here's the traditional overview post of the places I've visited.

Visby and Gotland's west coast

A Medieaval town that belonged to the Hansa League and to the Gotland Trade League before, with some well conserved town fortifications, a cathedral, nice old houses (trade made for rich merchants who in turn built pretty houses to show off), and a few ruins.

Visby, the town walls

I took a bus tour along part of the west coast of Gotland so I could catch bits of the landscape, too. We had some interesting stops. The flip side to guided tours are the other people in the group, but I managed to keep their appearance on photos to a minimum.

Bronze Age ship setting

Stockholm, and Stockholm Archipelago

I've lived there back in the 80ies. It was nice to revisit the place. The sun played along, too, as it did most of the tour. No grey and stormy Baltic Sea photos, I'm afraid. Well, we got some of those along the Norwegian coast last year.

Stockholm, the town hall

One place was new to me; the Vasa Museum where Gustav Adolf's flagship, which had sunk in Stockholm harbour in 1628 and was resurrected in the 1950ies, is now displayed in full splendour after years of conservation and reconstruction work.

Vasa Museum

Our ship, the Albatros, cruised the archipelago in the evening which made for some great motives There are about 2400 islands of all sizes from several square miles to 'just a boulder with a fir tree', and on the larger ones, many Swedes have summer houses.

Romantic islands in the evening sun

Helsinki and Porvoo

Helsinki is a rather young town, compared to places like Visby, but there was a tour to nearby Porvoo, a small Mediaeval town with pretty timber houses which, albeit not exactly Mediaeval (those had a habit of burning down during history), give the place an old fashioned, charming flair.

Helsinki Cathedral


We stayed in St.Petersburg for two days. It's the time of the white nights now when it doesn't get fully dark but a twiliight remains. It was unusually warm, too. Petersburg is a town of golden-cupolaed cathedrals, splendid palaces, and cars. London has nothing to the chaos on the roads in St.Petersburg.

Church of Christ's Resurrection

The town is also bascially built on a swamp (by Peter the Great) and it's a place with a history of assassinations. The above church was erected on the spot where Tsar Alexander I got killed, and Tsar Paul wasn't safe in his pretty palace below, either.

Palace of Tsar Paul

I took an evening cruise on the many canals that cut through Petersburg which was a nice change to the road traffic.

(More in the post below)

Wow, what a great trip. St Petersburg is somewhere I'm really keen to visit, as well as the capitals of the Baltic states!
Welcome back, Gabriele! Some fabulous photos in these two posts. I'll look forward to more :-)
Some neat photos in these two posts. Thanks for sharing!
Visby. A great shame that....
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The Lost Fort is a blog based on my travels in Germany, the UK and other places, with essays on Roman and Mediaeval history illustrated with lots of photos of old castles, cathedrals, Roman remains, and beautiful landscapes. You may also find the odd essay about geology or Mediaeval literature.

All texts (except comments by guests) and photos (if no other copyright is noted) on this blog are copyright of Gabriele Campbell.

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Location: Germany

I'm a blogger from Germany with a MA in Literature and History which doesn't pay my bills, so I use it to research blogposts instead. I'm interested in everything Roman and Mediaeval, avid reader and sometimes writer, opera enthusiast, traveller with a liking for foreign languages and odd rocks, photographer, and tea aficionado. And an old-fashioned blogger who hasn't yet gotten an Instagram account. :-)