My Illlustrated Travel Journal with Essays about Roman and Mediaeval History and some Geology


31.10.14
  More Time Travel Tours

I know I've been a bad blogger and not updated for weeks. Well, I blame a nasty cold, lots of work at the money job, a nice journey (yay) and more job work. But I've finally found time to sort my latest photo booty and share some of them with you.

Our four day tour this time led us westward, to Paderborn (which will be covered in its own post) and the the area of Lippe / Egge Mountains / Teutoburg Forest. A land equally rich in history as the Harz, with its share of castles and churches.

Reconstructed long house from the Late Neolithic period, Archaeological Museum Oerlinghausen

The Archaeological Open Air Museum in Oerlinghausen is a fun place and we spent a nice bit of time there. They got everything from a tent of the reindeer hunters to a 7th century Saxon long house. Since it was late into the season already, there were no performances of old crafts, but also almost no tourists.

The Neolithic house, interior

The trapezoid shaped long house is part of the so-called Rössen Culture (4300 - 3500 BC) and modeled after finds at the Rhine. The culture spread over a large area in Middle Europe. The pillar beams are a bit thicker than archaelogical finds prove, thanks to modern safety laws.They lit actual hearth fires there on occasion, so a smokey smell was in the air.

Bronze Age long house, interior

We're getting a bit more stylish in the interior of a Bronze Age long house. There are even sleeping bunks and a ladder leading to the storage floor above. It is a house with the living/sleeping quarters for humans on one side and shelter for the cattle on the other; separated by an entrance room.

A post slot wall, 3rd century BC

The above photo shows the reconstruction of a Celtic post slot wall (Pfostenschlitzmauer), a variant of the murus gallicus Caesar describes, dating to the 3rd century BC, though it was in use at least until the time of the Gallic wars. The structure is a three-dimensional timber framework filled with stone and earth. Remains of the original have been found on a hill near Oerlinghausen.

Roman camp Anreppen, reconstructed double trench

We got Romans, too. *grin* The camp of Anreppen-Delbrück is part of the line of semi-permanent forts along the Lippe used during the campaigns of Drusus (16-9 BC) and probably also Varus (AD 6-9) in Germania. Anreppen may have been the wintering camp; it could hold an entire legion, and at least the officers had half-timbered houses. The layout follows the structure of more permanent forts.

7th century Saxon long house, Oerlinghausen

This 7th century Saxon house is supported by exterior beams and thus doesn't need any pillars in the inside, making room for a spacious hall. It follows a pattern often found in Westphalia. The house is accompagnied by a reconstructed pit house and a smithy, forming a 'Saxon village'.
 
Comments:
Hope you're feeling better. There's quite a difference in the Bronze age longhouse reconstruction in your picture - in Britain, they were roundhouses, as the Celts believed evil spirits would dwell in corners.
 
That's interesting, Anerje. The Bronze Age house reconstructions here are all rectangular (the one in Oerlinghausen and the post outline near Derenburg). Which is particularly baffling since we have a Celtic strata here as well as a Germanic one.
 
Thank you for the photo of the reconstructed Celtic wall. Sometimes it's hard to imagine how things from the past really looked like... the book descriptions are not enough ;-) One needs to see it with their own eyes.
 
I hope you had a nice time in Ostwestfalen. The weather was a little bit rainy at some days. The Archeological Museum in Oerlinghausen is small, but really interesting.
 
Kasia, that's why I love visiting old places and museums. :-)

Maegwin, I wish we had more time; there's a lot to explore in your home area.
 
Thanks for the interior shots of the houses. It gets my story curiosity going. And of course, anything Roman is always welcome.
 
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The Lost Fort is a travel journal and history blog based on my travels in Germany, the UK, Scandinavia, and other places. It includes essays on Roman and Mediaeval history, as well as some geology, illustrated with photos of old castles and churches, Roman remains, and beautiful landscapes.

All texts (except comments by guests) and photos (if no other copyright is noted) on this blog are copyright of Gabriele Campbell.

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Location: Germany

I'm a blogger from Germany with a MA in Literature and History which doesn't pay my bills, so I use it to research blogposts instead. I'm interested in everything Roman and Mediaeval, avid reader and sometimes writer, opera enthusiast, traveller with a liking for foreign languages and odd rocks, photographer, and tea aficionado. And an old-fashioned blogger who hasn't yet gotten an Instagram account. :-)


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